Home » Design Theory: An Introduction for Product Design and Engineering by Robin McKenzie
Design Theory: An Introduction for Product Design and Engineering Robin McKenzie

Design Theory: An Introduction for Product Design and Engineering

Robin McKenzie

Published July 8th 2014
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
336 pages
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 About the Book 

This book is a third in a series of introductory books relating Product Design and Engineering.This book is preceded by Book 1 (Definitions of Design), and by Book 2 (history of industrial design), is followed by one further book on case studiesMoreThis book is a third in a series of introductory books relating Product Design and Engineering.This book is preceded by Book 1 (Definitions of Design), and by Book 2 (history of industrial design), is followed by one further book on case studies (Book 4).The author gives a number of reasons for writing this series of books. One reason is that this accompanies a series of taught lectures that the author gives.However, a more significant reason is that the author believes that there is a separation between the world of Product Design, and that of Engineering.Product Designers tend to come from an artistic background. Engineers come from a background of mathematics and physics. Broader understanding of what design is, and how to design, tend to be lacking. Designers tend not to have a good understanding of the engineering difficulties with their design. Engineers do not have a broader understanding of the people and situations within which any design is first chosen.The author, Robin McKenzie, has been involved with engineering all his life: in factories, industrial design and marketing, broader business relationships, and in teaching. He also has an insight into industrial product design. He is therefore well placed to link these two areas of design.By engineering, the author also includes other technology based disciplines, such as architecture and computer science. The term engineering is used as a short hand description for all these technology based disciplines.The series of books has been designed to be read one after the other. However, each of the books in this series is free standing, and can be read independently of the others.In this third book the author outlines some of the theories in design or models of design.In the first chapter we break down understanding of design in the way that art and artists might well do. We then link these will suitable design in product design and engineering. We rely extensively on the categories by Alan Pipes.Chapter 2 is a longer chapter that outlines four different models of design in engineering.The first model is technology created design. This follows a linear sequence from initial research, through design, manufacturing, to sale.A second model is that of using structure systems to find the most appropriate design to follow.A third model is that of designing for an observed need. Here, the designer has a nearly fully formed solution to a problem that he or she identifies.A fourth model is that using mathematics and physics. This is the model most usually used by engineers.Chapter 3 now looks at design from the perspective of the product designer. Here we can identify three different models that are used.The first model arises from following a brief from a client. There are six different criteria that should be considered, and we will do so here.A second model follows a linear process of design. This model is similar to that followed by engineers in chapter 2.A third and final model is one that draws on many different sources for inspiration for design.Chapter 4 provides a summary of the manufacturing process used for product manufacturing. There are four different types of process: forming, cutting, joining, and finishing. Any designer should have some knowledge of these processes. We review a number of more extended case studies here.Chapter 5 is a rather different chapter, but one that is important for design. Here we review the requirements for regulations, and what is covered within intellectual property.So much design is constrained by international rules and regulations. Here we outline some of these different types of regulation.All design is done within the constraint of law, called intellectual property.